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Posts Tagged ‘Will Tuckett’

Contemporary Music

I’ve been to enough Ben Folds concerts to know that they can be can be hit-and-miss affairs. He often fools around so much, at the expense of musical quality, but at his February Hammersmith Apollo concert he got it just about right. The songs from Lonely Avenue (penned with novelist Nick Hornby) worked as well on stage as they do on record, but it was the older stuff which really came alive – and he has the most tuneful fans as the choruses proved conclusively!

Classical Music

The classical month started with a lunchtime concert at Wigmore Hall, part of the YCAT season dedicated to providing early recital experience for young artists. This one showcased soprano Caroline MacPhie accompanied by Joseph Middleton and you’d never believe it was her first recital if you didn’t know, such was the quality of her singing and her confidence. It was a hugely ambitious programme  that packed in 21 twentieth century songs by Rodrigo, Poulenc, Britten and Bridge in Spanish, French, Russian and English! In truth, I thought it was a little heavy for lunchtime and a little less volume and more subtlety would have helped, but the ambition and talent is unquestionable. One to watch.

Opera

Lucrezia Borgia sees the ENO missing another opportunity to encourage talented young opera directors in favour of film director opera virgins. As if uncomfortable leaving his comfort zone, Mike Figgis framed his opera debut with four films, which were frankly more dramatic than anything on stage. With cardboard cut out sets and static singers, it looked dreadfully old-fashioned. The English libretto was occasionally silly (perhaps not surprising as it was translated by the conductor, Paul Daniel – is ENO determined to cross disciplines!), but thankfully there was some good singing.

Dance

It’s taken me 10 years to see Ballet Black (on their 10th anniversary!) and very impressive they were too. The four short pieces in the first half showed off their style and range, but it was Will Tuckett’s Orpheus one-act ballet that followed that was the highlight. It was in the Linbury Studio, so by law it had to have a Tuckett work, obviously.

Film

Brighton Rock was better than the reviews, but there was still something missing. Both the city and the period looked great and with a cast like Helen Mirren, Andrea Risborough, John Hurt and Phil Davies it was watchable, if a little slow at times.

True Grit is an extraordinary piece of film-making, even if it isn’t really my sort of film – too violent, I’m afraid. The cinematography is gorgeous and the performances are terrific, with Jeff Bridges better than he’s ever been and Matt Damon unrecognisable; the young girl, though, stole the show.

I hadn’t read the book of Never Let Me Go. I decided to go and see it despite the reviews because it had two of my favourite young actors – Carey Mulligan and Andrew Garfield. It’s very John Wyndham, but I’m afraid I found the basic premise a bit preposterous and the film was very slow and very dull.

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I think Covent Garden should rename the Linbury Studio Theatre the Tuckett Studio Theatre, such is the number of Will Tuckett’s dance theatre shows it has mounted! This one started life in the smaller Clore Studio a couple of years ago and has now been promoted to the Linbury for a long 30-show Christmas run.

Like Matthew Bourne’s Cinderella at Sadler’s Wells, this is set during the second world war when a brother and sister are evacuated from London. When the brother finds he’s to be separated from his sister, he escapes and ends up in a park with the fairies where most of the action unfolds.

Rebecca Lenkiewicz’ story is a bit convoluted for the younger part of its target audience (7-14, though again parents think they know better and there were a lot of bored or scared under 7’s) & a bit overlong at 80 minutes without a break. There’s far too much pointless running around passed off as ‘choreography’ and as dance theatre it fails.

However, I really liked Martin Ward’s score, played live by keyboards and clarinet, and the  puppetry by Blind Summit is excellent (except when they’re part of the pointless running around!). It looks like they haven’t changed the design from the smaller space and it looks a bit lost in the Linbury. The performances though are good all round and as theatre it’s a partial success.

If they scaled it up and shortened it, it would be a whole lot better. I found myself looking at my watch half-way through feeling as if I’d got as much out of it as I was going to get out of it.

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CONTEMPORARY MUSIC

Using the label ‘Folk’ for Seth Lakeman stretches it somewhat. I can live with folk-rock, but the driving rhythm of his sound stretches even that. It works so much better live than on record, though he’s wise to keep his set short and snappy to prevent it becoming relentless; the bass is pushed too high and it’s close to hurting (one of my companions had to move back after the first number). The Open Air Theatre was a terrific venue and it was the most exciting folk-rock set I’ve heard for more than 25 years (it reminded me of Fairport Convention and Alan Stivell when they rocked). There was a sex imbalance in the audience the opposite of what’s usual at ‘folk’ concerts – he’s a good looking guy who has quite a following with the girls! The unannounced support of A John Smith, who’s CD I like a lot, was a bonus – his melancholy on record was lightened live, helped by a charming self-deprecation in between songs.

The Kings Place Festival is an eclectic selection of 100 concerts over 4 days, each costing no more than £4.50. We took in three 45-minute folk concerts in one evening and a contrasting collection they turned out to be. Eliza Carthy showed off her technical expertise at both fiddle playing and acapella singing; her dad Martin Carthy’s set with Dave Swarbrick was more about nostalgia, such is the decline of skill and passion with age; and the best was left to last, with a set of great warmth and charm from Chris Wood. This is turning out to be a great venue.

I have a memory of seeing Tom Jones & The Squires at Penyrheol Community Centre (one mile from my home and three from his) before he had his first hit. When you look at his chronology and mine, this seems a bit implausible but my recollection is vivid! So this is (possibly) my second Tom Jones concert – 150 miles away and 45 years later – in Islington’s Union Chapel in Sept 2010. It was a small-scale showcase for the new gospel blues album Praise & Blame (which I love) and was announced by a ticket agency on Twitter. I thought it might be fun, but wasn’t expecting something so musically perfect; the songs sounded even better live, the band was terrific and his voice simply extraordinary. The venue was so perfect – Jones in front of the pulpit beneath the backlit stained glass rose window singing gospel! A real treat.

OPERA & MUSIC THEATRE

Peri’s opera Euridice, written in 1600, may be the first ever opera. 380 years later prolific composer Stephen Oliver produced a new version with the songs and choruses intact, an English translation and new ‘accompaniment’ and this is what British Youth Opera showcased this month. It’s the classical myth of Orpheus & Eurydice – with a happy ending! – and it was simply staged with costumes but no set. Somehow the lovely early music songs & choruses and modern accompaniment work well together and both the singing and playing from the cast of 18 and tiny 8-piece ensemble (intriguing instrumentation including cowbells, handbells, banjo and tabor!) were excellent. BYO’s name conjures up images of pimply teenagers but these are the next generation of opera singers currently studying at our best music colleges so, like the GSMD operas, the standards are really high.

ENO’s Faust is a lot better than the reviews lead you to believe. It seems to me perfectly legitimate to make Faust an atomic scientist at the time of Horoshima and the production worked for me. Some of Gounod’s music really is lovely and it is particularly well sung by Toby Spence as Faust, Iain Paterson as Mephistopheles and Melody Moore as Marguerite, with excellent support from Benedict Nelson, Anna Grevelius and Pamela Helen Stephens. ENO’s MD Edward Gardner yet again gets the best out of his band, and the chorus are on fine form. Director Des McAnuff is better known for theatre (notably the excellent Tommy and Jersey Boys) but I think his second outing in an opera house tells us he may well produce even better work in this form.

I much admired Pleasures Progress, Will Tuckett’s music theatre staging of William Hogarth sketches at the ROH’s Linbury Studio, though I was exhausted and fed up, so I didn’t get as much out of the evening as I should have. Very bawdy and often gross, it was a clever cocktail of music, dance and theatre which was superbly staged, designed, performed and played.

OTHER

I was hugely impressed by my visit to Denbies Winery in Dorking. I remember buying a bottle of their wine many years ago and thinking it was ghastly! Well, now it’s the largest winery in the UK producing over 250,000 bottles (80% sold from the cellar door) and the whites and rose were very nice indeed. They’ve cleverly expanded the business to include a winery tour (by people mover!) with an excellent 360 degree film & tasting and a tour of the vineyards by ‘train’.

I had 30 minutes to kill between afternoon tea with an Icelandic friend passing through and pre-theatre drinks with visitors from Somerset (as one does!), so I popped into White Cube at Mason’s Yard. Having returned from the Faroe Islands just a month ago, imagine my surprise to fine 10,080 photos – one taken each minute for a week – from that very place. Darren Almond’s exhibition also had some terrific film footage from Siberia with a hugely atmospheric soundtrack. Such is life lived on impulse…..

I thought Open House was going to be a damp squib this year as I’d only booked for one building (the brochure arrived AFTER booking opened – so much for advance ordering! – by which time everywhere I wanted to visit that had to be booked was fully booked). So I took pot luck with non-bookable buildings expecting to find queues, give up and get fed up. Well, it actually turned out to be one of the best ever with 12 visits. I only gave up on one (the BBC’s Bush House) and only really queued once, though I was seated watching videos so it was hardly a chore at all. Saturday started with Carpenter’s Hall, which added to my ‘collection’ of livery companies. The Arts Council (the one I booked) was a clever refurbishment which produced a funky and comfortable work space with great contemporary art in an old terraced building with stunning views of Westminster Abbey, Parliament and the London Eye from the terrace. Channel 4 was a riot of glass and steel, typical Rogers, and I couldn’t understand how I hadn’t walked past it in 15 years. The Ruebens ceiling at the Banqueting Hall was terrific and the place oozed history (I can’t understand why I’ve never been there before). The Foreign Office self-guided tour was really well organised and I loved the state rooms like the Locarno Suite and the Durbar Court. They were unloading Popemobiles outside. I then had to cross the anti-Pope demo in Piccadilly to get to The Royal Society of Chemistry and The Geological Society, neighbours in Burlington House, which had both benefitted from tasteful refurbishment.

On Sunday, the visit to The Royal Ballet Upper School was much more than a walk along the extraordinary ‘Bridge of Aspiration’ (which was terrific) with performance videos while you waited and dancers rehearsing on your tour route. Parliament’s Portcullis House is hideous on the outside but a lot better on the inside, with excellent contemporary art and an exhibition of photos taken during the last election. I loved the simple elegance of the Ismaili Centre; the towers and turrets of the neighbouring South Kensington museums peeping over the walls of the gorgeous roof garden. It was rather surreal walking through Brompton Cemetery while Chelsea fans were using it as a short-cut to the game and druggies were hanging out around the graves. Finally, I visited the art nouveau / art deco former Finsbury Town Hall with wrought iron entrance canopy and stunning Great Hall. This is a once-a-year opportunity which I can safely say I exploited fully this year!

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