Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Tschaikovsky’

Prokofiev’s score for this ballet – and his Romeo & Juliet – is at least as good as any of Tchaikovsky’s and in my opinion it’s so much better when danced in a fluid modern way than in a fusty classical style. When Matthew Bourne first staged it 13 years ago, I enjoyed it a lot and was a bit surprised it wasn’t as much of a hit as his now legendary staging of Swan Lake, so it was good to get a second look.

To all intents and purposes it’s the story we all know, though Cinderella’s family is expanded to include three step-brothers, the prince is an airman, the fairy godmother is a male angel and the ball is an evening at the Cafe de Paris dance hall……and it all takes place in the blitz…..and it works! Cinderella goes to ‘the ball’ in a motorcycle sidecar. The step-sisters are ugly on the inside so we’re spared grotesques. Though the airman searches for Cinderella with her shoe in hand, we get none of the try-it-on stuff; instead we’re whisked through the streets of London, in the Underground and on the Embankment. There isn’t much of a wedding, but we see them off on their honeymoon from Platform 12 at Paddington Station (somewhat spookily, an hour later I was departing from Platform 13 at Paddington!).

Bourne’s choreography is, as always, fresh and fluid. I’m not sure who danced who at the performance we attended, but I don’t think it matters – they were all great. I was nervous that he’d dispensed with a live orchestra, but surprised that this didn’t actually bother me – maybe because the recorded sound was superb and the occasional integration of a blitz soundscape very successful. I would have complimented Lez Brotherston’s designs, but I understand he doesn’t want to be referred to in blogs, so I won’t.

This is the great populist modern dance style that made Bourne’s name and on this showing, he’s lost none of his creativity and talent. Another Christmas treat!

Read Full Post »