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Posts Tagged ‘Tim Oxbrow’

I revisited this 1986 show a couple of years ago when Craig Revel Horwood, who had by then taken over John Doyle’s mantle as the master of actor-musician musicals at the Watermill Newbury, directed a touring version. This is what I thought of it https://garethjames.wordpress.com/2011/03/13/chess  – more like a staged concert and a bit X-Factor. Still not sure whether it was the production or the show, I couldn’t resist seeing it at fave haunt The Union Theatre where it appears to be their hottest ticket ever as it sold out before opening (the show clearly has its fan base, as the 2008 Royal Albert hall concert showed). 

Almost everything that was wrong about the touring production is right about this production. The design is a simple, elegant and effective and the sound is great. The production values are as good as they’ve ever been at the Union with more lights than you’d need for the average rock concert. It is mostly performed in a square space in front of an audience on three sides and a raised platform on the fourth above and to the side of which we have floating chess squares. It does look a bit cramped when all 16 performers occupy the square, but the space is nevertheless used well.

The ladies fare better than the men. I loved both Sarah Galbraith’s Florence and Natasha J Barnes’ Svetlana (though she was prone to the occasional screech) and Gillian Kilpatrick’s sinister Molokova is excellent. Nadim Naaman is very good as Anatoly, but I’m afraid Tim Oxbrow’s Freddie was vocally harsh and Craig Rhys Barlow’s voice too weak for The Arbiter.

As to the show, well I’m afraid I feel the same as I did last time. The story didn’t engage me emotionally or intellectually, the music’s OK but only OK and at 2h40 mins it outstays its welcome by at least 20 minutes. So, an impressive production by a team new to the Union, but a show that hasn’t passed the test of time and now needs to be packed in the ‘old musicals’ box and returned to the attic.

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