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Posts Tagged ‘Sope Dirisu’

This play is the second part of a trilogy but was the first to be produced here ten years ago, with part one, In the Red & Brown Water, a year later. We’ve yet to see the third. Playwright Tarell Alvin McCraney has had a couple of other plays at the Royal Court, Wig Out! and Choir Boy, but is most famous for his 2016 Oscar winning film Moonlight. This is a very early revival by the same creative team, led by director Bijan Sheibani.

The Size brothers are reunited when younger brother Oshoosi leaves prison and stays with elder brother Ogun, working with him in his car repair business. A visit from Oshoosi’s fellow prisoner Elegba, a bad influence, threatens the bond between them and their up-and-down relationship is played out before us over 80 minutes. It’s staged without set or props within a chalk circle marked out at the beginning, with red chalk thrown on the floor within it. The actors often announce entrances and exits and other stage directions direct to the audience and there’s very stylised movement and an atmospheric soundtrack. It’s very compelling, even hypnotic and mesmerising, though the apparent Yoruba mythology went over my head and I struggled a bit with the Louisiana dialect.

The three performances are captivating. Anthony Welsh as Elegba is excellent; he was in the original production. Sope Dirisu, after his Cassius Clay in One Night in Miami and Coriolanus for the RSC, continues to impress as Ogun. Newcomer Jonathan Ajayi is hugely impressive as Oshoosi, transitioning from ex-con to childlike young brother as the story unfolds.

It’s good to see it again, ahead of its time now as it was then. It’s a very short run, so catch it while you can.

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I’m fond of Shakespeare’s Roman plays, so the RSC’s four-play season is very welcome, but it took me a while to warm to this opening production, the first part of which seemed strangely unanimated and perfunctory.

The titular character is a war hero and leader, but he can’t hide his contempt for ordinary people who, stirred up by a couple of politicians, banish him. His revenge is to join his former enemy and invade Rome, until his mother persuades him otherwise, which leads to his new comrades turning against him. There’s something very resonant about it in current times!

The crowd scenes and tribunal scenes of the first, rather dull, part lack passion, but later scenes, like Coriolanus’ offering himself to the enemy, his mother’s pleading and the final scene are particularly well staged. The design has something to do with my early disappointment – I groaned when I walked in to see a forklift truck and fully loaded pallets and I tired of brick walls, metal roller doors and greyness.

Sope Dirisu, who I admired as Casius Clay in One Night in Miami at the Donmar last year, is an excellent Coriolanus and Haydn Gwynne is superb as his mother, Volumnia. I thought the casting of Martina Laird and Jackie Morrison as the tribunes worked well and there’s fine work from Paul Jesson as Menenius, Charles Aitkin as Cominius and James Corrigan as Aufidius.

If only the first part packed more of a punch and the design served the play better.

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My knowledge of the US civil rights movement in the 60’s was weak, but is stronger for seeing this excellent play by American Kemp Powers; I love it when I learn something at the theatre.

The night in question is the one when Cassius Clay, as he was then called, beat Sonny Liston to win his world title in 1964. He’s in a hotel room with friends Malcolm X, soul singer Sam Cooke and footballer Jim Brown. Outside the room there are two security guards placed there by The Nation of Islam to protect their spokesman.

It’s a pivotal point for all four. Clay is about to convert to Islam and change his name to Mohammed Ali. Cooke has written his civil rights anthem, A Change Is Gonna Come, but will soon meet his untimely death. Brown has commenced his second career, acting in his first film. Malcolm X is about to quit The Nation of Islam.

They debate the issues of civil rights and their differing attitudes and perspectives. Malcolm X may not be as hard line as they thought and the guards may be as much to control as protect. Is Sam Cooke selling his soul as he sings it? Clay’s conversion may be a touch reluctant. Is Brown ignoring what’s going on around him and just concentrating on having a good time? It’s a fascinating debate, without being preachy or earnest, and packs a lot into a well written, entertaining 90 minutes.

Six fine performances too. Arinze Kene brings Cooke to life, singing superbly. Sope Dirisu’s characterisation of Clay is playful and spot on. Francois Battiste captures Malcolm X at a turning point, still defiant but inwardly doubting. David Akala’s Brown is the good-time guy and there’s fine support from Dwane Walcott and Josh Williams as the two contrasting guards. I’d wondered why we’d not seen or heard from director Kwame Kwei-Armah for so long. It appears he’s been directing and running theatre companies in the US. It’s good to have him back, though I’m not sure how long that’s for.

Another fine evening at the Donmar.

 

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