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Posts Tagged ‘Sion Daniel Young’

I think I would best describe this intriguing play by Ed Thomas as Samuel Beckett meets Dylan Thomas. It’s dialogue is poetic and it’s story is obscure, something I often turn against, but here I found it rather captivating.

John Daniel and his wife Noni are the last inhabitants of Bear Ridge. They’ve had to close their butchers shop. The post office has stopped delivering mail and their phone line has been cut. Their shop assistant & slaughter-man Ifan William has stayed with them. We don’t exactly know why Bear Ridge is being deserted, though it appears to be the result of a war of some sorts. Fighter planes occasionally fly overhead and an army man, The Captain, pays a visit.

Their conversation ranges from their plight to reminiscences about a happier past and reflections on tragedy, when we learn that John Daniel & Noni’s son, and Ifan William’s best friend, went to university to study philosophy but was killed because he spoke ‘the old language’. The Captain, a clearly tortured soul, has his own tragic story to tell. I’m still trying to piece it all together, with an intriguing note in the play-script suggesting it is ‘semi-autobiographical’.

Rhys Ifans and Rakie Ayola are both terrific as the couple at the centre of the story, with fine support from Sion Daniel Young as Ifan William and Jason Hughes as The Captain. Cai Dyfan’s design is hugely atmospheric, the exit of the walls representing the decline, as is the music and sound design. The Royal Court’s AD Vicky Featherstone co-directs with the playwright.

National Theatre Wales has gone through a difficult time of late, but it’s good to see them back, and in London, with this Royal Court co-production. I suspect I will be processing it for some time yet.

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I missed this at the Bush Theatre last year, so I was pleased the NT picked it up. By the time it finished, pleased became delighted. It’s a play which tackles serious issues with great warmth, delicacy and humour. I loved it.

Kelly is a feisty, funny twenty-something with Down syndrome living with her mum Agnes in Skegness and working for a charity. She has a high degree of independence, but Agnes is very protective. They are very close, but the relationship is tested when Kelly strikes up a friendship with Neil, who works in an amusement arcade. This friendship becomes a relationship which Agnes tries hard to break up, including finding Dominic from Scunthorpe on the internet, a boy with asperger’s, to date Kelly, which makes Kelly even more entrenched.

Agnes finds it hard to believe that Neil is genuinely in love, fearing exploitation. The relationship continues, though the course becomes rockier, for reasons it would be a spoiler to disclose, and they separate at one point. Neil and Kelly are subjected to disbelief, discrimination and abuse by some they meet. Dominic becomes a wise confidante of both Agnes and Kelly. 

It sensitively covers issues around disability, particularly reconciling the genuine wish and need to protect with the appropriate degree of independence and freedom, but it does so with such humour it is at the same time truly entertaining, without losing any of its impact. It’s beautifully written by Ben Weatherill, who has a real talent for sharp and witty dialogue that often surprises.

Sarah Gordy is captivating as Kelly, clearly relishing and identifying with her gutsy, sharp-tongued character. In an appropriately restrained performance, Sion Daniel Young brings an authenticity to this loving relationship, investing his character with gentleness, sensitivity and empathy. Penny Layden captures both the love and protectiveness of Agnes, bringing a seriousness that balances the humour of other characters. Nicky Priest is delightful as Dominic, delivering some of the funniest lines to perfection with deadpan delivery, the whole audience falling for his charm.

It’s a tonic to see such a heart-warming, hopeful show, informing and entertaining in equal measure. A real treat.

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I saw the three previous Barney Norris plays at the Arcola and the Bush, in their smaller spaces, so I was wondering if his unique brand of wistful, poignant charm would survive scaling up to a big London theatre like the Bridge. Half-way through I wasn’t convinced, but by the end I was.

We’re back in rural south England, this time a Hampshire farm. The two years since her husband’s illness and subsequent death have been a struggle for Jenny, her son Ryan, daughter Lou and her boyfriend / Ryan’s best friend Pete. Ryan and Pete were involved in a drunken incident which resulted in Pete’s imprisonment and his split from Lou. The farm, which Ryan is somewhat reluctantly continuing to run, is deep in debt. Ryan and Pete have taken a huge risk by siphoning oil from the pipeline running through the farm (a touch implausibly, I thought). They’re all grieving in different ways.

A hell of a lot more happens in the second half where we see the games people play. We learn that Jenny and Ryan knew more about Pete’s fate than was thought. Lou and Pete rekindle their relationship. Jenny struggles to keep the family together and some of her tactics backfire. We begin to wonder if Ryan’s friendship with Pete, for him, is more than it seems. Lou and Pete make plans to leave and Ryan seeks to persuade his mother to sell up. In the end, the family saga and rural decline come to a rather sad conclusion.

Rae Smith’s design manages to evoke the countryside without losing the intimacy of the individual scenes in yet another different use of the new Bridge space. In thirty-five years of London theatre-going, its the first time I’ve seen a pipeline and actual brick-laying live on stage! All four performances – Claire Skinner as mum, Sion Daniel Young as Ryan, Ophelia Lovibond as Lou and Ukweli Roach as Pete – are excellent. Laurie Sansom’s staging is as fine as we’ve come to expect from him.

Despite an unevenness between the two halves, Norris just about survives the scale-up. To be recommended.

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Killology is a computer game, a rather nasty computer game where the more vicious the killing, the more points you accumulate, and it’s made Paul a fortune. He’s one character in this play; the other two are Davey, the victim of a crime which may be inspired by it, and Davey’s estranged dad.

I loved playwright Gary Owen’s last two plays Violence & Son and Iphigenia in Splott, but I struggled with this at first, largely because of the non-linear narrative and the lack of interaction between the characters, but it drew me in. This is partly because it is unpredictable, and you have to work to piece it together, and partly because of the three brilliant performances.

It’s an excellent debate about how computer games may influence behaviour, but it’s much more than that. It covers issues of guilt, revenge and retribution, parental accountability, but above all father and son relationships, which seem to be indestructible, whatever is thrown at them. It becomes very moving at times, particularly when Davey ends up looking after his dad, which he never did for him.

I was impressed by Sion Daniel Young when he played the lead in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time on my second visit and I was just as impressed by his performance here as Davey, particularly how he matures from boy to man. Sean Gleeson plays his dad, Alan, with great conviction and passion. Richard Mylan does very well conveying the somewhat unsympathetic character of Paul.

It may not be up to the previous two, but it does confirm Owen as a major playwright and it’s well worth catching.

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