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Posts Tagged ‘Rajha Shakiry’

For some reason this early 80’s Athol Fugard play moved me more today than it did during the apartheid period in which it was written and is set. Perhaps it’s relief that, though there’s much wrong with the world today, that particular slice of inhumanity is over.

Fugard’s biographical play is set in a cafe in Port Elizabeth in 1950, the early days of apartheid. It’s owned by a white woman but run by her two black employees, Sam and Willie. The owner’s son Hally regularly visits after school and Sam & Willie have had more to do with his upbringing than his alcoholic father and about as much as his mother; Sam is very much a father figure. They have developed strong supportive relationships, regardless of apartheid. The men are rehearsing for a ballroom dancing competition which at first seems incongruous, but proves both in keeping and charming, when Hally comes home from school to a meal and news of his dad’s discharge from hospital, which sends him into a rage. He takes it out on the men, demanding to be called Master Harold and adopting typical apartheid behaviours of superiority, something he soon regrets.

Fugard hasn’t changed the names of the real people portrayed, including his own, Hally. The piece represents his apology to Sam and Willie; sadly the former died a matter of days before he could have seen it. It’s a gentle piece which shows the inhumanity of apartheid through these relationships more powerfully than shouting from the rooftops would, but its much more than that. The ending is poignant and deeply moving. Lucian Msamati gives yet another beautifully judged performance as Sam. Hammed Animashaun continues to impress with Willie, a very different role that shows and extends his range – from Bottom to Willie in a matter of months! It appears to be Anson Boon’s stage debut as Hally, and an impressive one it is too. Rajha Shakiry’s design anchors the piece in its place and period, beautifully lit by Paule Constable. It’s only the second play I’ve seen by director Roy Alexander Weise, and I’m already a fan.

It’s great to se it again after such a long time, particularly as it proves to be much more than a play of its time. Fugard is not only a key figure in the history of South Africa in the last half of the 20th Century, but a hugely important one in international theatre and this classic belongs on a world stage like the National.

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This Bush Theatre transfer is a real breath of fresh air for the West End. Arinze Kene’s play is an extraordinary concoction of drama, performance poetry, rap and music, staged brilliantly, with a virtuoso performance from the playwright himself. I found it thrilling.

Misty tracks black Londoner Lucas as he navigates the city, starting with an altercation on the night bus, struggling with the changes to, and gentrification of, his city. It also tells the story of the playwright, developing his work with advice and interference from the producer, his agent and friends. Both are interwoven in a series of inventive short scenes, many with music, with the two musicians, the stage manager and a young girl providing brief characterisations of others. It’s structure confounds you as its originality pleases you.

Rajha Shakiry’s simple stylised design relies on Daniel Denton’s terrific projections and shadows to create evocative stage images beautifully lit by Jackie Shemesh. Omar Elerian’s staging is masterly, creative and unpredictable. The music, played live by Shiloh Coke and Adrain McLeod, seems an organic part of the story, and Elena Penoa’s sound made it exciting but fully audible. Arizne Kane has bucketloads of charisma and presence and his performance is stunning. All of the components come together to produce a truly captivating evening, with the audience erupting at the end.

I knew of Kene’s talent as an actor from One Night in Miami and Girl from the North Country, but I had no idea that he had such an original writing voice too. Unmissable.

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This fascinating and rather timely play is actress Natasha Gordon’s hugely impressive playwriting debut. It seems like a breath of fresh air at the NT; the Dorfman was positively buzzing.

Single mother (and grandmother) Lorraine gave up her job to nurse her mother Gloria through her last days with cancer. Gloria came to Britain from Jamaica in the Windrush days (hence its timeliness on the 70th anniversary, even more timely given recent revelations). Lorraine’s brother Robert, his white wife Sophie, Lorraine’s daughter Anita and Gloria’s cousin Maggie and her husband Vince visit during her final hours, and when she dies jointly plan the traditional Jamaican Nine Night ritual and wake. Conflicts emerge between Lorraine and Robert, and both of them and Maggie, and Sophie has a revelation of her own. When step-sister Tanya, left behind by Gloria in Jamaica with her grandmother, arrives more skeletons emerge and the spirituality of the ritual ramps up.

It was clear that those of shared heritage understood more and got more out of it than me, but that didn’t stop me from enjoying a fine play and superb performances, chief amongst them Franc Ashman, who is outstanding as put-upon Lorraine, riding an emotional roller-coaster, and Cecilia Noble’s extraordinary creation that is Aunt Maggie. Rajha Shakiry’s uber-realistic London home and Roy Alexander Weise’s assured direction serve the play well.

I might have missed some cultural references (tip – read the programme in advance) and some dialogue from the most heavily accented characters (and the sustained audience laughter), but I still had a rewarding couple of hours of first class theatre.

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