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Posts Tagged ‘Old Vic: In Camera’

Old Vic in Camera showed me the difference between viewing plays live online and viewing recorded streams; the former are more engaging, probably just because you know you’re watching as it happens. This one from Nottingham Playhouse has the addition of a live audience in the theatre, which was a bonus, adding atmosphere.

James Graham’s Rom Com revolves around a couple whose first date is just before lockdown. They are faced with the choice of putting the relationship on ice for the duration of it, or moving in together and forming a bubble, after only one date! Both options are played out in parallel, by split screens online (I’m not sure how in the theatre).

Though it is primarily the story of an unlikely relationship, there’s a fair bit of lockdown reality in there too, but it’s always light, never heavy. Jessica Raine plays teacher Morgan, who hosts the bubble option in her flat, her excitement making her seem more like a teenager. Pearl Mackie plays Ashley, a modern woman running a micro-pub, bubbling with enthusiasm. Both performances on a virtually empty stage carry the narrative well.

Given the depth, quality and detail of Graham’s other work, it did seem like a work-in-progress, but it was an engaging seventy minutes which worked well online.

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I’ve long had a problem with staged monologues; I like to see characters interacting in my plays. I thought I might have melted after all those streamed performances, having enjoyed Sea Wall & Three Kings with Andrew Scott in particular. This 1979 play by Brian Friel consists of four monologues by three characters, but I’m afraid at 2.5 unbroken hours it did’t hold my attention, as it hadn’t on stage.

Frank Hardy is a faith healer who tours Scotland and Wales, and latterly his home country of Ireland. The other characters are his wife Grace and manager Teddy. We hear from them in that order, with Hardy returning to conclude the piece. In addition to their experiences on the road, events like Hardy’s return home after twenty years as his mother dies, the loss of Frank and Grace’s child and Grace’s death are also covered, Friel leaving some questions unanswered. Though the prose is appealingly poetic, the narrative didn’t satisfy me, and it certainly doesn’t sustain its length.

Some great actors have been attracted to these roles over the years. The original London Hardy was Patrick Magee, who was followed by Ken Stott & Stephen Dillane, and now Michael Sheen, who it has to be said is mesmerising. Helen Mirren was London’s first Grace and Sinead Cusack, Geraldine James, Gina McKee, and now Indira Varma, who is excellent, have followed in her footsteps. Ron Cook, Iain McDiarmid and Warren Mitchell (on radio) have all played Teddy, with David Threlfall on top form in this production.

I can’t help making comparisons with Alan Bennet’s recently revived Talking Heads. Their economy and brevity contrasts with this play’s verbosity and they are like colour to Faith Healer’s black & white. Sadly more is less, despite a trio of fine performances.

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As much as I’ve appreciated theatre’s making them available, I’ve been struggling to engage with streams of recorded shows in lockdown, perhaps because I’d already seen many of them in the theatre, so I was curious how I might get on with a live one. Playwright Stephen Beresford (an extraordinary playwriting debut at the NT with Last of the Haussmans, the excellent adaptation of Fanny & Alexander at the Old Vic and the screenplay for the brilliant film Pride) and actor Andrew Scott, whose streaming of Sea Wall was a notable exception, made this a real draw too.

Scott is relayed live from the Old Vic stage, the empty auditorium as his backdrop. He tells the story of his character’s estranged father and the few encounters he’s had with with him. We learn about his sister and later their brother by another wife and the multiple relationships and locations of his father. Its mostly direct to camera and Scott is mesmerising, but there’s also judicious but clever use of split screens and other features. I found it totally captivating, much more than my live open air promenade performance a few days previously. The addition of the sound of audience anticipation before the start and appreciation at the end helped create the almost live experience, with the added benefit of close-up dialogue and action.

A real success; now I can barely wait for Faith Healer, the next one, in a couple of weeks.

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