Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Michael Gambon’

When I picked up my ticket, I saw I was in the back row – the last time I was in the back row at Jermyn Street Theatre I hardly saw a thing; such are their sight lines. When I entered the auditorium (a bit of an exaggeration for a basement room with 70 seats) I sighed with relief when I saw they’d put in a stage. When I left I asked if it was permanent and was told ‘no’ – dreadful decision, JST!

Anyway, to the play….a Samuel Beckett radio play that’s never been staged, no doubt because of the notorious Beckett estate’s protection bordering on paranoia. The solution seems to be to turn the theatre into a radio studio with hanging microphones, cast on chairs at the sides, everyone with scripts. The one concession was a cut-out car door needed to properly illustrate the very large Mrs Rooney (played by the ever so slight Eileen Atkins) getting in and out of a car. It would be tempting to close your eyes, but to do so would miss the great Dame’s extraordinary range of facial acting.

She’s on a journey to meet her blind husband and encounters seven other characters on the way. This is such ‘event theatre’ that these bit parts are played by premiere league actors (apart from the boy, who will no doubt dine out on this experience for the rest of his life). I’m not sure I entirely understand it (or if I’m supposed to) but the journey is charming, poetic, funny, poignant and engrossing. Michael Gambon’s Mr Rooney switches emotional state on the turn of his head in a virtuoso display of acting. The Dame and the Knight do not disappoint; if anything, liberated of the need for much stage business they shine more.

I’d now like to hear it on the radio so that I can see if the staging adds or takes anything away. A gentle and satisfying 80 minutes. Has director Trevor the-longer-the-better Nunn ever done anything this short?

Read Full Post »

Michael Gambon is stunning in Beckett’s 50-minute monologue. It’s a long time before he moves and you can feel the tension in the audience ‘is he OK?’. When he does, he’s like a cross between King Lear and a clown. He hardly speaks, but his face and movement tell you much. I can’t say I entirely understand it (typical Beckett) but it’s worth the visit just to see the master in action.

With this and Caryl Churchill’s 50-minute two-hander A Number sandwiching Arthur Miller’s Broken Glass, I have to say the latter does feel even like a feast though….and at 60p a minute (with my early booking discount!) it is a bit cheeky – it made me think that maybe the opera is good value after all…..

Read Full Post »

I’m finding it hard to believe it’s only 8 years since I saw the original production of Caryl Churchill’s play about cloning at the Royal Court. I remember the starry casting of  Michael Gambon and Daniel Craig and the West End transfer being scuppered by their refusal to move with it.  I remember finding it intriguing, but confusing and ultimately an unsatisfying 50 minutes. So why did I go and see it again?

Well, because it’s at a lovely intimate theatre – the Menier Chocolate Factory (though on Friday suffering from distracting extraneous noise of a band rehearsing somewhere) – and father and son Timothy West and Sam West play the father and sonS.

It must have been ahead of its time in 2002 because the debate about cloning in the subsequent 8 years make it now seem more timely. I’m not sure the father and son casting actually added anything and I still found it intriguing, though a little less confusing, but  just as unsatisfying.

Read Full Post »