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Posts Tagged ‘Marcel Ayme’

This musical by Michel Legrand had a short run on Broadway in 2002 and, despite being a commercial flop, managed to get some Tony nominations, including Best Score. A Broadway musical it is not, but a delightful, funny, charming, tuneful chamber musical it is, and the Royal Academy of Music’s British première is both a coup and a triumph.

Based on a short story by Marcel Ayme, and set in early 50’s Paris, the show follows civil servant Dusoleil’s through his very dull life – until he discovers he can walk through walls! – entirely in song; around 40 of them in fact, some quite short. He consults a doctor but doesn’t take the prescribed medication, and does nothing much with his new powers until he gets a nasty new boss on which he exerts revenge. This leads him into a life of crime and he ends up in prison, which of course isn’t much of a problem for a man who can walk through walls. When he escapes he meets Isabelle, abused by her husband, and he uses his powers for clandestine visits to see her. When he gets a headache, he takes the prescribed medication mistakenly for asprin and loses his powers.  When he finally ends up in court, he finds he’s a bit of a folk hero.

The story is immortalised in Paris by a statue, a fact made great use of in the show. The tunes are lovely and Jeremy Sams’ English lyrics are very funny indeed. Director Hannah Chissick’s excellent staging, with a simple monochrome design by Adrian Gee, has a lightness of touch and flow that has a lot to do with the movement of co-director and choreographer Matthew Cole. Jordan Li-Smith’s seven piece band plays the jazz influenced score beautifully and there are some fine voices in the cast of nine led by Chris McGuigan, who navigates Dusoleil’s journey from dull bureaucrat to a man uncomfortable with his powers to a more bold one using them freely. They all deliver in both the vocal and acting departments and once you’re into the unusual rhythm of the piece, you’re drawn in by its charm and humour.

A delightful show and showcase for some outstanding talent that I’m sure we’re going to be seeing much more of.

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