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Posts Tagged ‘Lee Honey-Jones’

Our now annual outing to the lovely Watermill Theatre near Newbury turns out to be another treat – despite the fact it’s not a particularly good show. It’s amazing how you can breathe life into something by design, staging and performance.

It started as a film with music in 1967 and only became a stage musical, with this score,  in 2000.  I have less than fond memories of the West End transfer of the original 2002 Broadway production 9 years ago, featuring a wooden Amanda Holden as Millie and Maureen Lipman (uncharacteristically) doing comedy-by-numbers. With a fraction of the resources, this production is so much better.

Director Caroline Leslie and designer Tom Rogers were behind last year’s Radio Times (about to embark on a UK tour – don’t miss it!) and again they produce something fresh and funny with just enough of its tongue in its cheek. The design is a hugely inventive use of this pocket-handkerchief space. The backdrop, a black & white map of Manhattan, turns out to have two staircases which you don’t at first see. Doors, windows, curtains and office furniture slide in from the sides (not always smoothly at this third preview – the cast managed to get a few extra laughs from that!). The 30’s costumes are terrific and as they are also largely black & white, when we get splashes of colour they stand out brightly. They even manage to stage a skyscraper window ledge scene effectively!

It’s one of those ‘I’m-sure-I’ve-heard-it-before’ stories (Wonderful Town, anyone?) about a naive country girl (Kansas on this occasion) coming to NYC to start a new life. She has her eyes set on her boss as a husband but instead gets a lovable loser – or is he?  It doesn’t really matter, as it’s a good enough vehicle for lots of laughs (most coming from the superb Amy Booth-Steel as both Mrs. Meers and the office manager), dance routines and general chirpiness.

The now familiar Watermill house style sees the cast doubling up as the band, providing a sound that isn’t technically perfect but is good enough. After a shaky start, Eleanor Brown came into her own as Millie and was well matched by Lee Honey-Jones as Jimmy. Staging it with just 12 actor / musicians is nothing short of miraculous and they all deserve a mention.

The Watermill’s summer musicals prove consistently good, even though we’re now on the third (?) creative team. Well worth a trip west.

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