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Posts Tagged ‘Jean Anouilh’

Jean Anouilh must be one of the world’s most prolific playwrights, writing over 60 plays in a 40 year writing career, but we see few of them (his adaptation of Sophocles Antigone most often). This adaptation of his first big hit, Le Voyageur sans bagage, relocates it from late 30’s France to late 50’s USA, to the Long Island of the American upper middle class in fact (think Philadelphia Story), though the French songs between scenes are a delightful nod to its origin.

A soldier returns to the US 14 years after the end of the second world war with amnesia ,and is placed in a sanatorium. Nouveau riche Marcee Dupont-Dufort moves on from rescuing dogs to finding his family, much to the chagrin of her husband De Wit Dupont-Dufort. With the help of a gossip columnist she selects the most likely family from the 22 possibles and visits them. They take him in but he soon decides he doesn’t much like them or his past self. When the gossip columnist names them, the other 21 turn up, which proves chaotic but also an opportunity.

Blanche McIntyre’s production sparkles in every sense, from Anthony Weight’s crackling adaptation to Mark Thompson’s bright design and her own impeccable staging, but mostly because of the terrific casting. Katherine Kingsley is a joy to behold as Marcee Dupont-Dufort, a trophy wife with a touch of Mrs Malaprop about her. Danny Webb is gloriously unrecognisable, stooped and moustachioed, cigar permanently in mouth, channelling Groucho Marks, as her straight-talking husband. Sian Thomas is a treat as the snobby mother and Fenella Woolgar a delight as her brittle daughter-in-law. Oh, all ten are terrific!

This was such a fun night in the theatre, which made me wonder how many more gems are hidden in Anouilh’s back catalogue. Proper entertainment.

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