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Posts Tagged ‘Jackie Shemesh’

Th creative components of this piece are formidable, and in many respects new to theatre. Based on an obscure 4000-year-old Egyptian story, never (?) or at least rarely dramatised, adapted by Ben Okri, better known as a novelist, designed by Sir David Adjaye, an architect making his first foray into theatre. The staging, though, is in the safe hands of Young Vic AD Kwame Kwei-Armah.

Adjaye’s design for this in-the-round production is a pyramid that unfolds to become a star shaped floor. A bigger inverted pyramid hangs above it, touching it, onto which there are superb projections by Duncan McLean. Lighting by Jackie Shemesh, music by Tunde Jegede & sound by XANA complete the beautiful look and sound of the piece.

At the beginning, the actors play a game to determine who takes the part of protagonist Sinuhe, on a journey through Lybia, Egypt and Syria. Our Sinuhe was Joan Iyiola who, with Ashley Zhangazha, plays 99 other parts, all of which they have to learn, given the decision point at the outset. It took a short while to get into the story, but then it seemed to zip along.

It’s a great tale, well told, and I loved the design aesthetic, but I wasn’t fully satisfied at the end, perhaps because it was a bit insubstantial for a full evening, perhaps because at almost £1 a minute I felt short-changed, or maybe a bit of both. That said, it’s something new, something different, and you can’t really argue that the inputs aren’t expertly crafted.

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I loved Inua Ellams last play, The Barbershop Chronicles, so much so that I went twice. This is a very different proposition, a storytelling two-hander, a poem really. The staging and performances are excellent, but I’m afraid I failed to engage with the story.

Demi is a Nigerian basketball prodigy. We learn that he is the result of his mother Modupe’s rape by Greek god Zeus, the prize in a bet with a Yoruba god. Demi is therefore a half god, which gives him powers over and above his sporting prowess. When he learns how he was conceived, he’s intent on revenge. Half god v the most powerful god of all.

The performances of Kwami Odoom as Demi and Rakie Ayola as Modupe are captivating, prowling around the stage, very animated. Max Johns’ simple design, Jackie Shemesh striking lighting, Tanuja Amarasuriya’s atmospheric sound design and Imogen Knight’s movement contribute significantly to Nancy Medina’s excellent staging. In the end though it was the story itself which left me cold. The previous play had so much truth, humanity and energy. This just had energy.

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This Bush Theatre transfer is a real breath of fresh air for the West End. Arinze Kene’s play is an extraordinary concoction of drama, performance poetry, rap and music, staged brilliantly, with a virtuoso performance from the playwright himself. I found it thrilling.

Misty tracks black Londoner Lucas as he navigates the city, starting with an altercation on the night bus, struggling with the changes to, and gentrification of, his city. It also tells the story of the playwright, developing his work with advice and interference from the producer, his agent and friends. Both are interwoven in a series of inventive short scenes, many with music, with the two musicians, the stage manager and a young girl providing brief characterisations of others. It’s structure confounds you as its originality pleases you.

Rajha Shakiry’s simple stylised design relies on Daniel Denton’s terrific projections and shadows to create evocative stage images beautifully lit by Jackie Shemesh. Omar Elerian’s staging is masterly, creative and unpredictable. The music, played live by Shiloh Coke and Adrain McLeod, seems an organic part of the story, and Elena Penoa’s sound made it exciting but fully audible. Arizne Kane has bucketloads of charisma and presence and his performance is stunning. All of the components come together to produce a truly captivating evening, with the audience erupting at the end.

I knew of Kene’s talent as an actor from One Night in Miami and Girl from the North Country, but I had no idea that he had such an original writing voice too. Unmissable.

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