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Posts Tagged ‘Hirokazu Kore-eda’

Great to be back in the NT’s Dorfman Theatre, one of my favourite spaces, configured as a large room in an institution where we go for a week when we die to choose the one memory we will take with us to the afterlife. Filing cabinets and shoes represent the people who have, will and are passing through. We watch a handful of arrivals on Monday and follow them through the week, each led by a guide, someone who came before but never passed through.

It may sound like a depressing premise, but it leads to a lighter, charming and thought-provoking play in the hands of favourite Jack Thorne (based on the Japanese film by Hirokazu Kore-eda), developed by him with designer Bunny Christie and director Jeremy Herrin. It does have the feeling of a collaboration about it, with every component – performances, staging, movement, design, lighting, music, sound – working in harmony. I’ve been rather preoccupied since trying to decide which memory I would choose!

The new arrivals at first struggle with the concept of making such a choice, then grapple with the process of choosing, but by Saturday they are fully absorbed by the memory; well, most of them. The guides take their roles with different levels of seriousness, but all become engaged with their subject’s former life in the process. It’s a necessary process, but a benevolent one; they are genuinely trying to help them move on. They are of all ages and backgrounds, but of all of them, its 90-year-old Beatrice, beautifully played by June Watson, who melts your heart.

The production has a lightness of touch that gives it an other-worldliness in keeping with the material. I found it captivating, moving without being sentimental, it lulled me into a very reflective state. Lovely.

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