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Posts Tagged ‘Glenn Slater’

When I discovered the master of mush was going to adapt Richard Linklater’s 2003 film I was a bit baffled. Julian Fellowes also seemed an unlikely candidate for the book, and Glen Slater only a bit more likely as lyricist. Only when I read the reviews did I decide to give it a go.

The story concerns failed rock musician Dewey Finn, who impersonates his best friend and temporary landlord Ned Schneebly to get a teaching job at a prep school. He discovers the musical talents of his pupils and decides to mould them into a rock band and enter them into the Battle of the Bands, up against his old band, No Vacancy, which dumped him. He manages to cover up the fact his class have only been studying the history and practice of rock music and rehearsing the band until the day of the contest, when both the principal and the parents find them at it. Dewey disappears, but the kids won’t give up and they find him and persuade him to take yet another risk and perform at ‘the battle’, after which all is forgiven in a sea of goodwill. It follows a similar path as last Saturday’s Strictly Ballroom – allow kids to be themselves and their true talents will emerge.

It’s even more fun on stage than on screen, largely because of the talent and infectious energy of the thirteen kids and their pied piper Dewey. There’s something delightful about seeing pre-teenage kids playing cracking guitar licks, mean bass lines, thrilling drum solos and keyboard pyrotechnics on what sometimes seem like giants instruments, and the singing and dancing (mostly jumping!) is terrific. It’s also very funny, even more so than I remember the film being. I got the alternate Dewey, Gary Trainor, who was no second best – superb – as was Rosanna Hyland, covering the role of the school Principal, with sensational vocals. The kids were ridiculously good.

I surprised myself by how much I succumbed to the infectious charm of Laurence Connor’s excellent production. The master of mush has, at least for the moment, become the master of rock. Great fun.

 

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Well you have to, don’t you? Go and see something that divides people. Make your own mind up.

Well, I’m not with the phans and I’m not with the whingers. I actually don’t regret going (though I didn’t pay, so I might have felt differently if I’d coughed up the £67.50 my seat cost) though I wouldn’t go again. The show’s the problem; the production is the reason to go.

The truth is there isn’t much of a story – SPOILER WATCH – Phantom goes to NYC and sets up a freak show – anonymously invites Christine over to sing  (she needs the money as she’s now married to a drunken aristocrat) – her son turns out to be the Phantom’s – she dies. It’s spun out for 2.5 hours with another one of Ben Elton’s pathetic books, undistinguished lyrics from Glenn Slater and another dose of ALW’s mushy pop-opera music.

BUT the production and performances really are good, so there’s stuff to look and wonder at and singing and acting to admire. I wasn’t impressed by Sierra Boggess (the title song was the lowspot of the evening for me) but was hugely impressed by the Phantom’s understudy, Tam Mutu. The boy – Harry Child at the performance I saw – was terrific. Summer Strallen almost steals the show with her quick-change-almost-strip number. A big talent like Joseph Milsom is rather wasted in the rather underwritten role of Raoul.

The orchestrations are great and the 27-piece orchestra really does sound good. There is some nice music, though not enough – but it’s a lot better than Woman In White. Bob Crowley’s design with Jon Driscoll’s projections, Scott Penrose’s special effects and Paule Constable’s lighting are highly effective. The sound is amongst the best I’ve experienced in a musical. Director Jack O’Brien and choreographer Jerry Mitchell do their best with the material they’re given.

In the end, it proves yet again that ALW really does need a collaborator as good as Tim Rice; chairing a committee with Elton, Slater and Frederick Forsyth (!) just doesn’t produce a good show. So, a great production in search of a good show. You’re left to admire the talent on and off stage and in the orchestra pit.

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