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Posts Tagged ‘Gillian Kirkpatrick’

This musical is based on the 1992 debut novel of American writer Robert James Waller. It sold 60 million copies and became one of bestselling books of the 20th Century. He probably couldn’t believe his luck. Clint Eastwood made it into a film three years later, starring himself and Meryl Streep. Jason Robert Brown’s musical adaptation got to Broadway nine years later, and now has its UK premiere at the Menier Chocolate Factory, for which it has received the whole gamut of stars, from five to one; marmite indeed.

The story revolves around Francesca, who left Naples at the end of the Second World War, following American GI Bud Johnson to the US. In the brilliant opening number she tells us her story from wartime loss of boyfriend Paolo, the sea journey to New York and train across the US to her new life in Winterset, Iowa where she becomes a farmer’s wife, bringing up two children. When we join her there, the family head off to the State Fair in Springfield Illinois, where daughter Carolyn is showing her prize steer. While they’re away she meets and falls for National Geographic photographer Robert Kincaid, who’s in town to take pictures of those bridges of the title. It’s a sort of mid-west Brief Encounter!

Jon Bausor’s brilliant design seems to enlarge the Menier space, with three huge barn like doors, onto which images are projected, and two revolves moving us from the main location of the family kitchen to the State Fair, a neighbouring home, the fields outside, one of those covered bridges and a truck on the road, though it’s sometimes a bit noisy, during as well as between scenes, with involuntary movements of furniture occasionally comic (oh, and they need to repair the fridge door!). That aside, it’s a truly evocative design matched by Trevor Nunn’s staging, which flows beautifully.

It seems to me that the different views on the show are probably driven by the score and your attitude to love stories. Well, I’m a sucker for the latter (yes, there were tears again) and I think the lush eclectic Americana score is gorgeous, an antidote to the bland formulaic pop of most contemporary musicals. The songs, and there are a lot of them, maybe a few too many, really do propel the story and develop the characters, keeping just the right side of sentimentality, well, until the very end. I liked the way many of the cast get a number that brings their character briefly to the fore, enabling them to showcase their talents, notably Shanay Holmes and Georgia Brown.

Francesca provides yet another career high for Jenna Russell, as a very different character which she inhabits with conviction and authenticity. She’s well matched by Edward Baker-Duly as Robert, the finest performance I’ve seen by this actor, with a Glenn Campbell like velvet voice which so suited the songs. Dale Rapley provides fine support as Bud and there’s a lovely cameo from Gillian Kirkpatrick as neighbour Marge and an auspicious professional stage debut by the appropriately named Maddison Bulleyment as Carolyn.

Well, I’m with the four star gang. A lovely show staged and performed to perfection. Go and make your own mind up

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This is a very impressive and original new British musical by first timers Eamonn O’Dwyer and Rob Gilbert, and in good shape for a first outing.

Both acts start seven years in the past when David, who makes mirrors, dies in an accident in his workshop. His elder daughter Laura witnesses, and may have had a part in, his death.  Seven years on we see a family broken apart. Laura has withdrawn into herself and her relationship with her mother Anna is badly broken. Her younger 15-year-old sister Lily is precocious and promiscuous, to some extent encouraged by her mother, who has turned to drink. They take in lodger Nathan, who is working on an anthology of the poetry of an ancestor, to help pay the bills. All three women are attracted to Nathan and seek a relationship, though of different sorts. David’s ghost drifts in and out, but only appears to Nathan and Anna. Nathan unwittingly acts as the catalyst for the resolution of the family’s dysfunctionality.

It’s very well structured, unfolding like a mystery. O’Dwyer’s score is very attractive and not derivative like many new musicals, though it is vocally challenging and some of the performers sometimes misfire with a touch of harshness, flatness or over singing. It’s beautifully played by a trio of keyboards, cello and reeds under MD David Randall. David Woodhead’s design makes excellent use of both levels of the Arcola space, more so that just about anything else I’ve seen here. Leigh Davies’ sound is also amongst the best I’ve experienced in an amplified fringe musical (maybe you should hire him, Southwark Playhouse?!)

Gillian Kirkpatrick’s Anna is the emotional heart of the piece and she’s excellent. Jamie Muscato is outstanding as Nathan, with superb vocals, a very different role to the one he played in Dogfight but just as impressive. Graham Bickley is David and his musical theatre experience shows, again with particularly fine vocals.

It’s not faultless, but its an impressive first musical and an impressive first outing in an impressive production by Ryan McBryde. Musical theatre aficionados should be sure to catch it in its last two weeks.

 

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I revisited this 1986 show a couple of years ago when Craig Revel Horwood, who had by then taken over John Doyle’s mantle as the master of actor-musician musicals at the Watermill Newbury, directed a touring version. This is what I thought of it https://garethjames.wordpress.com/2011/03/13/chess  – more like a staged concert and a bit X-Factor. Still not sure whether it was the production or the show, I couldn’t resist seeing it at fave haunt The Union Theatre where it appears to be their hottest ticket ever as it sold out before opening (the show clearly has its fan base, as the 2008 Royal Albert hall concert showed). 

Almost everything that was wrong about the touring production is right about this production. The design is a simple, elegant and effective and the sound is great. The production values are as good as they’ve ever been at the Union with more lights than you’d need for the average rock concert. It is mostly performed in a square space in front of an audience on three sides and a raised platform on the fourth above and to the side of which we have floating chess squares. It does look a bit cramped when all 16 performers occupy the square, but the space is nevertheless used well.

The ladies fare better than the men. I loved both Sarah Galbraith’s Florence and Natasha J Barnes’ Svetlana (though she was prone to the occasional screech) and Gillian Kilpatrick’s sinister Molokova is excellent. Nadim Naaman is very good as Anatoly, but I’m afraid Tim Oxbrow’s Freddie was vocally harsh and Craig Rhys Barlow’s voice too weak for The Arbiter.

As to the show, well I’m afraid I feel the same as I did last time. The story didn’t engage me emotionally or intellectually, the music’s OK but only OK and at 2h40 mins it outstays its welcome by at least 20 minutes. So, an impressive production by a team new to the Union, but a show that hasn’t passed the test of time and now needs to be packed in the ‘old musicals’ box and returned to the attic.

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