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Posts Tagged ‘Daragh O’Malley’

Northern Ireland playwright David Ireland has delivered two of the most surreal and controversial new plays of the last five years – Cyprus Avenue at the Royal Court, where a unionist was obsessed by his baby granddaughter’s likeness to Gerry Adams, and Ulster American at the Traverse in Edinburgh, where an Ulster Protestant playwright is outraged by Hollywood’s rewriting of Irish history. This 2011 play, now getting its British premiere, pre-dates them both, but is just as surreal and an even more controversial black comedy, a metaphor for the unionist view of Northern Ireland after the peace process.

Alan is bothered by his neighbour’s barking dog so he visits the doctor who diagnoses depression. Not satisfied, he goes the the BBC to seek mediation from Eamonn Holmes. He confronts his neighbour who claims he has no dog. Is it all in his head? What follows is a bestial attack on the dog, a visit from the paramilitary to exact punishment for it and ‘eye for an eye’ revenge for the attack. Ireland’s coruscating humour is aimed at the solution to ‘the troubles’ through the peace process, from a unionist perspective.

It’s superbly acted, with Daragh O’Malley commanding the stage as Alan, and Kevin Trainor doubling up brilliantly as doctor and dog! There’s excellent support in two roles each by Laura Dos Santos and Kevin Murphy and by Owen O’Neill and Declan Rodgers in individual roles. Director Max Elton and designer Ceci Calf use the tiny Finborough space brilliantly. Ireland really is a one off, a very distinctive playwright and a lone voice in reflecting on the unionist perspective of recent history and the political situation today.

The Finborough proving indispensable again.

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Another neglected gem at the Finborough – this time a passionate 100 year-old play by St John Ervine about the sectarian divide in Northern Ireland.

Influential orange man John Rainey is persuaded by son Hugh and his catholic friend Michael to speak in encouragement of unity against employers exploiting the sectarian divide, but when he overhears his son expressing his love and intention to marry catholic Nora, he turns and reverts to anti-catholic rhetoric. This deepens the divide and starts riots in which the family is caught up.

The personal and political are played out together very successfully in Sam Yates’ excellent production. The writing is a bit idealistic, which makes it occasionally preachy, but it certainly packs a punch in its 80 minute running time. Though the political landscape may seem to have changed, personal attitudes like John’s clearly still exist, which gives the play a contemporary resonance. Richard Kent has created a very evocative one-room set with equally evocative period costumes. Aklex Baranowski’s terrific sound design effectively conjours up the off-stage riots towards the end of the play.

It’s beautifully played by a faultless cast. I don’t know how many of them have Northern Irish blood (if any) but the accents seemed to me to be spot on. Daragh O’Malley has huge presence and charisma as John, balanced by his more tolerant wife, beautifully played by Fiona Victory. Christopher Brandon’s Hugh and Damien Hannaway’s Michael are every bit as passionate as their roles require.  Joel Ormsby as younger brother Tom and Nora-Jane Noone as, well, Nora, complete the fine cast.

Yet another find and another deeply rewarding visit to the Finborough. If ever a theatre punched above its weight, this one certainly does.

 

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