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Posts Tagged ‘Christian Patterson’

Theatre owes a lot to The Restoration, the fifty-year period from 1660 to 1710 that followed an eighteen-year theatre ban. Playwrights, including the first women playwrights like Aphra Behn, wrote meaty roles for women who could at last play them themselves. Many of these ‘comedies of manners’, like this, have survived. I’ve seen around a dozenn and the last one, The Beaux Stratagem at the NT, sparkled. So I was looking forward to William Congreve’s last play, returning home to Covent Garden.

It’s a convoluted plot revolving around the relationship between Mirabell (an excellent Geoffrey Streatfield) and Millamant (wonderfully played by Justine Mitchell, hotfooting it over from Beginning at the Ambassadors around the corner). They need Lady Wishforth’s blessing to marry, but she wants Millamant’s hand for her nephew Sir Wilfull Witwoud. Mirabell’s friend Fainall is having an affair with Mrs Marwood, who once had an affair with him. Mirabell’s servant secretly marries Lady Wishforth’s servant and they plot to help Mirabell by deceiving Lady Wishforth.  As with all restoration comedy, it’s flowery character names, social satire that’s a bit lost on us three-hundred years on and much wordplay. The production is beautifully designed by Anna Fleischle, whose costumes are simply gorgeous, and it’s atmospherically lit by Peter Mumford.

For a comedy there are nowhere near enough laughs, particularly in the first half, which is one long, dull set-up. It picks up after the interval, with some particularly good scenes, notably the ‘proviso’ scene where Mirabell and Milamant negotiate the terms of their marriage, but it’s too late (particularly for the significant number who didn’t return!). It’s an excellent ensemble, with great performances from Jenny Jules as Mrs Marwood and Tom Mison as Fainall, both cold and calculating, and Christian Patterson as a very hearty and funny Sir Wilfull. There are lovely cameos from Fisayao Akinade and Simon Manyonda as Witwoud and Petulant and Alex Beckett and Sarah Hadland as the pair of plotting servants.

I came to the conclusion that the play is of its time and has nothing to say to a contemporary audience. If it was entertaining, it might still be worth reviving, but it isn’t – at 3 hours 15 minutes, it’s a long, dull evening. So much talent, but a play not worthy of it today.

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Verbatim theatre can be very powerful in presenting real issues, and this look at last year’s referendum is amongst the most powerful I’ve seen; thought-provoking but also highly entertaining. I’m rather glad I missed it at the National in February, as it seems to take on extra meaning post-election, and feels more at home in ‘a people’s theatre’ at the end of it’s 14-venue tour, mostly visiting the cities and towns in which the interviews that it features took place.

Britannia has convened a gathering and Caledonia, Cymru, Northern Ireland, the South West, North East and East Midlands arrive. After pleasantries, each conveys the words of the interviewees from their location, which eventually descend into inaudibility, talking over one another; no-one’s listening. Britannia represents and conveys the words of the politicians – Cameron, Johnson, Gove, Farage and May. Beyond this, each representative presents the best of their country / region in song, dance and poetry, with others commenting. It ends thoughtfully with the voices of the interviewees themselves as the representatives leave the stage. Carol Ann Duffy has put this together expertly.

The ensemble is outstanding, perhaps benefiting from being together for almost four months now. Penny Layden is terrific conveying the politicians. Christian Patterson represented my home country very well; his rendition of Goldfinger a highlight, as was Cavan Clarke’s Irish dance! Stuart McQuarrie is a superbly feisty Scot and Laura Elphinstone a brash Geordie. There were many laughs at the expense of Adam Ewan representing the South West as somewhat new age and Seema Bowri represented the diversity of the East Midlands well. Rufus Norris’ production manages to make this entertaining without belittling the seriousness of the situation, though I did feel uneasy at times laughing at the words of real people.

Excellent, relevant theatre, which does help you understand how we’ve got into this mess, though it didn’t lift my depression over it!

 

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