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Posts Tagged ‘Caroline Humphris’

Forty years before Stephen Sondheim turned up in a pie shop in Tooting, he went to see Christopher Bond’s play Sweeney Todd at the Theatre Royal Stratford East (I like to think he met another of my theatrical hero’s, Joan Littlewood, still their AD at the time) and so his musical Sweeney Todd was born. Twelve years later I went to the Half Moon Theatre in Stepney Green, three miles down the road,  where Christopher Bond, then their AD, was returning the compliment by directing Sondheim’s musical adaptation. That was my first Sweeney. Thirty-one years later I’m at Stratford East for my 21st performance / 15th production of the show by the students of the Royal Academy of Music, six years after I was at the RAM for the presentation of Mr. Sondheim’s honorary doctorate. I love all these connections!

They’ve made a great job of it too, in a more contemporary and very dark production by Michael Fentimam. The two-tier set allows a barber shop above the pie shop, though they haven’t included traps for the bodies. The oven is under the stage, which makes for dramatic plunges of ghostly walking bodies. There’s a lot of blood. The chorus are sometimes in blood-splattered white gowns, sometimes in retro contemporary dress, always in dark glasses. I wasn’t convinced by the introduction of a child, presumably to show Sweeney had some compassion. The eight-piece band under Torquil Munro sounded superb.

Elissa Churchill as Mrs Lovett started on a high with The Worst Pies in London and stayed there through A Little Priest, God That’s Good, By the Sea and her duet with Brian Raftery’s Tobias, Not While I’m Around, relishing every word of Sondheim’s brilliant lyrics; a terrific performance. Lawrence Smith was an excellent Sweeney, with the right mix of menace and mania, an appropriate contrast to Mrs L. Ruben Van keer was a superb Anthony, singing Joanna beautifully and passionately. There’s also a delightfully flamboyant Pirelli from Fransisco del Solar. It’s a fine ensemble; the class of 2016 are as good as any I’ve seen at RAM.

Rags was such a commercial flop on Broadway that I’m not sure it’s ever had a UK professional production. I’ve only seen another conservatoire production, at Guildhall School of Music & Drama, three years ago (https://garethjames.wordpress.com/2013/07/09/rags-at-guildhall-school-of-music-drama) so RAM at Stratford East is an opportunity for a second look at a show from the man who wrote the book of Fiddler on the Roof, the man who wrote the music for Annie and the man who did the music & lyrics for Godspell and Wicked!

The story of East European Jewish immigrants in New York City, exploited in the rag trade sweatshops, suits musical theatre. The ragtime infused score, with East European Jewish influences, sounds even better second time around, and it’s played beautifully by an orchestra twice the size of the Sweeney band, under Caroline Humphris. The vocal standards are high too, with Julia Lissel as Rebecca and Victoria Blackburn as Bella sounding particularly gorgeous. In addition to these two excellent female leads there are fine acting performances from Neil Canfer as Avram and Oliver Marshall as Ben.

I liked the idea of a back wall of suitcases and trunks and suitcases carried by the migrants used to create all of the props, but in practice it did make Hannah Chissick’s production seem a bit cramped. I wasn’t convinced by young David played by a six-foot-something actor with puppet, I’m afraid! The finale introducing a new wave of migrants was an inspired idea and a moving conclusion.

Both shows provided a wonderful showcase for thirty-two performers and twenty-five musicians about to launch their musical theatre careers. That’s a lot of talent!

 

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In a surprising co-incidence, the second full staging in the enterprising from Page to Stage season turns out to be covering similar ground as The Mistress Contract across the river at the Royal Court. It’s a 75-minute show which ‘illustrates’ the offer of a similar arrangement to 30-something New York girl Tess with the stories of four mistresses from history. It felt like work-in-progress rather than a finished piece; well it is part of a season of work in development after all!

The other mistresses are a 14-year old 12th century Chinese concubine, the mistress of a 16th century French king, an early 20th century New Orleans brothel madam and diarist of sexual exploits Anais Nin. We hear from them all; the trouble is we don’t hear enough from Tess, who seems more like a device for the other stories than a fully fledged character in her own right. I think Beth Blatt needs to flesh out her story and give it more substance.

Jenny Giering’s music is nice, though it lacked variety with just five female voices and a piano (gorgeously played by Caroline Humphris). Bronagh lagan’s staging and Eda Giray’s designs were both effective and elegant. The cast performed the material well; I was particularly impressed by Kara Lane and Nicola Blackman, but I felt Tess was a little under powered.

There’s a full show in there waiting to be brought out, but even as it is, I enjoyed it a lot more than the other one across the river!

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I think the name of this show is deceptive (and unwise). It conjures up images of a kids show or something twee. Well, it is somewhat sentimental, but it’s a delightful musical two-hander based on an early 20th century novel by Jean Webster which is in essence a love story.

Rich-but-benevolent New Yorker Jervis, a trustee of an orphanage, funds their brightest young girl through university anonymously, with one of his few requests being a monthly letter by way of a report on her progress. The story is largely told through these letters, over a period of four years until just after her graduation. Orphan Jerush meets Jervis as he is the uncle of one of her college friends, but she doesn’t know he’s ‘Mr. Smith’ her benefactor. If course, they fall in love and it all ends happily.

Paul Gordon’s score is simply beautiful, superbly played by a six-pice orchestra under Caroline Humphris. It is almost, but not completely, sung through with so many gorgeous melodies and lyrics which propel the story forward, though sometimes unevenly (some time periods getting longer than others). David Farley’s wood panelled period design and John Caird’s simple staging enable to show to flow seamlessly through a lot of scenes and a years.

Though I liked both Robert Adelman Hancock as Jervis / Smith and Megan McGinnis as Jerush, it was the latter’s vocal performances which blew me away; one of the best musical theatre voices I’ve ever heard.

The cheese level is a little high, but well worth living with for what I thought was a delightful chamber musical. This was my first visit to the new St. James Theatre (such a good name) and it’s a nice intimate space – very much like Trafalgar Studio 1 (steep!) but a little smaller size.

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