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Posts Tagged ‘Carly Mercedes Dyer’

I wasn’t planning to see another production of this Cole Porter show. Three great ones in 32 years, the last just 6 years ago, seemed like enough for now, but I have no willpower. The rave reviews and a desire to check out the acclaim for the London debut of Broadway’s Sutton Forster and the next thing you know you’re lying in bed on a Sunday morning booking for that afternoon on your iPad.

It is a great musical comedy, amongst the greatest, and this is a definitive production. You can tell it’s staged by a choreographer (Kathleen Marshall); it seems to glides and flow, and for once the Barbican Theatre feels like the most intimate of venues. The set, aboard a liner travelling from the US to the UK, and costumes are gorgeous and the band sounds terrific. This all serves the show well – the great tunes, the witty lyrics and the daft but hysterical story. Then there are the performances…..

A trio of national treasures with an average age of 70 – Felicity Kendal, Robert Lindsay & Gary Wilmott – are clearly a draw, and they all deliver. Lindsay in particular seems to be the epicentre of an infectious team spirit, perhaps the most nimble septuagenarian song & dance man, perfect for the role of lovable rogue Moonface. As always, he’s such a natural that you’re never quite sure how close he’s staying to the script. Sutton Foster redefines the triple threat – a superb dancer, a fine actor with exquisite comic timing and lovely vocals. No disrespect to Megan Mullally, but her injury appears to have provided us with an opportunity to glimpse this extraordinary talent, and she’s given a rousing welcome to these shores.

There are many other great performances, with Haydn Oakley as Evelyn, Samuel Edwards as Billy, Nicole-Lily Baisden as Hope, and especially Carly Mercedes-Dyer as Erma, who also brings the house down, but it was hard to take your eyes off the leading lady, simply mesmerising.

This is my third musical theatre treat in eight days. I don’t know how much of my euphoria is down to a 16 month famine, or the boundless enthusiasm of the performers and musicians back to doing what they love, but I’m enjoying the ride anyway. A good Sunday morning decision leading to a delightful Sunday afternoon.

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It’s almost forty years since I first saw this show, in a Broadway revival, and it’s been in my top five musicals ever since, so I was excited to see what this new production by Nikolai Foster, without Jerome Robbins’ iconic choreography, would be like. The answer is ‘thrilling’.

The story is as timeless as the Shakespeare play on which it’s based, but it seems to resonate more in the UK today, given our struggle with gang culture and knife crime. Even though the setting and period, book and lyrics, remain unchanged, it has a contemporary feel and edgy aesthetic, Ellen Kane’s new choreography contributing greatly to this, which makes it feel very fresh. The design team of Michael Taylor (set), Edd Lindley (costumes) and Guy Hoare (lighting) have respected the period whilst somehow making it feel like now. A luxury fifteen piece band under MD George Dyer do full justice to Bernstein’s brilliant score.

It’s been a great pleasure watching Jamie Muscato grow into such a fine performer and here he is owning one of musical theatre’s great roles, with breathtaking renditions of Something’s Coming, Tonight and Maria. Maria is superbly played and sung by Puerto Rican Adriana Ivelisse, here to study musical theatre at the Royal Academy of Music, but looking like she doesn’t need to (note to self – RAM student productions in 2020!). Carly Mercedes Dyer is a terrific Anita, leading America with Abigail Climer’s Conesuela and Mireia Mambo’s Rosalia, who both also stand out in I Feel Pretty. Then there’s another fifteen in this superb cast, enhanced by a ‘young company’ of local trainees, who fill the stage, most notably during a rousing, moving Somewhere.

The Curve has been working with the police and the local community on the issues covered in the show (how often do you get a programme note by the Chief Constable?!) which underlines the ongoing relevance of this sixty-year-old show, here feeling like its brand new. Thrilling.

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This musical has been created to raise awareness and pay tribute to the victims of a little publicised 1973 hate crime when a New Orleans gay bar was subjected to an arson attack killing 32, the biggest toll of such a crime before Orlando in 2016.

We meet fashion designer Wes in the present time. He’s relocating from New York to his home town of New Orleans, buying premises to showcase his work, without realising it’s the scene of the 1973 attack. As soon as he’s signed the deal, the magic of theatre brings the club alive again and we’re back in 1973 on the evening of the tragedy. Thus begins a conversation between two generations of gay people across more than forty years, with the seventies set as shocked at Wes’ openness as he is at their secrecy. The eight characters tell their stories, which together show the contrasting lives in the two periods.

Max Vernon‘s score goes from one ballsy number to another for the whole 120 minutes, with the vocal honours going to Tyrone Huntley as Wes, Carley Mercedes Dyer as bar tender Henri and Cedric Neal as Willie, with excellent backing from Bob Broad’s invisible band. Declan Bennett and Andy Mientus bring the homeless hustler Dale and Patrick, the boy abandoned by his parents at fourteen who ends up doing the same, to life with fine acting. It’s great to see Victoria Hamilton-Barritt again and she’s superb as Inez, the Latin mum of drag queen Freddy, a breathless high energy performance from Garry Lee. Lee Newby has created a realistic period bar and director Jonathan O’Boyle and choreographer Fabian Aloise use the small Soho space well.

You have to go with the fantasy of the time warp, but if you do you will be rewarded with a fascinating contrast between gay life then and now illustrated by some great songs.

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I hadn’t got to London when this first hit the West End in 1979, but I did get to see it at the Tricycle Theatre in 1995, on it’s way to a West End revival. It’s a surprise we’ve had to wait 24 years for this second revival, at Southwark Playhouse.

It’s a revue subtitled ‘The Fats Waller Musical’, conceived by Richard Maltby Jr, which celebrates black American jazz performers of the 20’s and 30’s, and Waller in particular, taking its title from one of his songs. There’s no story as such, just a feast of song and dance, most of the songs mini-stories in themselves. I was surprised at how many of them were familiar to me, thirty packed into ninety frenetic minutes.

Designer takis has turned Southwark Playhouse into a period club, with a glittering gold multi-level bandstand (no room for the drummer, who’s relegated offstage!) and a shiny gold dance-floor. Tyrone Huntley’s direction and Oti Mabuse’s choreography make great use of the space, though the use of the entrances brought sightline issues. Mark Dickman’s arrangements make it sound much more than a five-piece band, who play very well. Sadly, the Southwark sound gremlins were at it again, and we missed too many lyrics.

Overall, despite a talented, hard-working cast – Adrian Hansel, Renee Lamb, Carly Mercedes Dyer, Landi Oshinowo & Wayne Robinson – it didn’t fully take off for me, but given the enthusiasm of the rest of the audience, I put this down to our front row seats and associated sound issues, though I did wonder if the space was too small for it to breathe fully.

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