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Posts Tagged ‘Andrew Yon’

There’s great fun to be had in Walthamstow again with this London premiere of a neglected 1950 Cole Porter show with a great score.

You can see why its neglected – it’s a bit of a daft story, based on a 2200 year old play by Roman playwright Plautus. Greek gods Jupiter and his son Mercury are intent on having fun at the expense of a newly married mortal couple. Mercury is sent to whisk Helen & Art away under the guise of a story for journo Art to pursue in Greece and get a honeymoon out of it. Jupiter just wants to bed Helen and his wife Juno wants to make mischief in cahoots with Niki Skolianos, the criminal subject of Art’s story. It might be preposterous, but it does provide the setting for a lot of fun, togas and sex romps!

It might not have Cole Porter standards in it – well, apart from From This Moment On, which was removed before the original (unsuccessful) Broadway run but has returned for subsequent productions – but it really is a very good score with very good lyrics, and the vocal standards here are outstanding. Cameron Bernard Jones has a rich operatic baritone as Jupiter. Hugo Joss Catton has great presence and cheekiness as Mercury to go with his fine vocals. Rhiannon Moushall is feisty as well as vocally assured. Ruth Betterbridge as Helen and Megan Gilmartin as Chloe both sing beautifully. Aaron Clingham’s four-piece again provide great accompaniment.

Designer Andrew Yon’s clever set includes some Corinthian columns, a pediment, balustrade and dais, but also manages to allow enough space for Kate McPhee and Katie Deacon’s excellent choreography. The former also designed the bright, colourful costumes. Randy Smartnick’s production has the same infectious sense of fun that his Superman had at the same venue.

The only other production in the UK I’m aware of was Martin Duncan’s in Chichester 12 years ago. It was good (with Anne Reid, no less, as Juno) but this is better sung, so a must for musical theatre lovers.

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Ye Olde Rose & Crown Theatre had a great success with another rare and early Charles ‘Annie’ Rouse musical comedy, It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s Superman. This was his first show, back in 1960, which I’ve only seen once, at Guildhall School of Music & Drama ten years ago. My starting point was ‘they’ve got their work cut out with this one’.

It takes its inspiration from Elvis Presley signing up to join the army. Here, Conrad Birdie is the singer who’s about to become a GI. His record company boss Albert decides to spin his story and create a photo and TV opportunity for a last kiss with a fan. Fifteen-year-old Kim is selected and her family all appear on the Ed Sullivan Show, where it all goes wrong thanks to Kim’s jealous boyfriend Hugo. There’s a parallel story about Albert losing his secretary and love interest Rose after eight years of doing nothing, largely to avoid upsetting his possessive mother Mae. As Conrad heads off to enlist, Albert finally gets some balls and chooses Rose over his mother.

When I walked into theatre I was instantly impressed by Andrew Yon’s design. It’s a red, black and chequered diner with adverts and records (remember them?) on the walls and 50’s tunes being played as you enter. Ryan Walklett’s excellent costumes complete the spot-on period feel. It gets off to a shaky start, partly because the material of the first part is weak (it pulls almost all of its punches in the second half), and partly because the playing style was a bit all over the place, some OTT, some too restrained. It does pick up significantly and is really motoring in the second half, with great choreography from Anthony Whiteman in Baby Talk to Me and the Shriner Ballet. The design leaves ample space for the ensemble scenes and I liked the band in view and (sort of) in costume at the back. It’s not a great score, though a few songs are familiar, having a life outside the show – Put On A Happy Face in particular, but A Lot Of Livin’ To Do and Kids as well.

When they’d settled, there were good performances all round, and the loud, somewhat exaggerated acting style suited the broad comedy of the material. I particularly liked Liberty Buckland’s feisty, sexy Rose (Chita Rivera in the original production!) and Abigail Matthews as teenage fan Kim (if they ever make a bio drama of Imelda Staunton’s life, she’s a shoe-in for the role). There are lovely cameos from Harry Heart as Kim’s somewhat overwrought dad, Jayne Ashley as the acid-tongued Mae, Benedikt de la Bedoyere (what a name!) as Hugo and Stephen Loriot as Kim’s young brother Randolph. MD Aaron Clingham has opted for more oomph with a band including winds, bass and drums and that seemed to suit the material without drowning out the singers (were those mic’s I saw overhead?) and the musical standards were as good as ever here.

This theatre continues its essential role of putting on rarely seen musicals. This one won’t change your life, but you’ll have a lot of fun, and who knows when you’ll get the chance to see it again.

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