Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Amaka Okafor’

This is billed as ‘a radical new version of Henrik Ibsen’s play’, so radical that it has three settings 150 years apart and three of each of five characters (children are offstage and the former nanny, maid and porter are dispensed with). I sometimes don’t like versions that steer a long way from the original, but this is very clever and I liked it a lot. Somewhat ironically, my female companion didn’t agree.

It’s played out in three parallel periods – 1918, at the end of the war as women vote for the first time; 1968, when contraception and abortion bring huge societal change, and 2018, when #metoo brings a new wave of feminism to the world. There’s a Nora in each period, the actress doubling up as her friend Christine in another period. The other three characters are husband Thomas (Torvald), Christine’s old flame and Nora’s nemesis Nathan (Nils) and Thomas’ friend Daniel (Rank), three of each. Despite this, I thought it was surprisingly faithful to the original.

The play interweaves the periods, with the story moving forward within them rather than repeating, and it’s deftly done. The deception that Nora has made in order to protect her family comes back to haunt her, Nathan using it to protect himself and his job. Christine’s history with Nathan and Daniel’s illness are both introduced, and every character’s behaviour and attitudes reflect the period, though nothing really changes, which is playwright Stef Smith’s point. I’m not sure she needed the Noras’ summary direct to the audience at the end to underline it, though.

It must be very hard to switch character and period as you turn your body and / or put on a scarf, but Anna Russell-Martin, Natalie Klamar and Amaka Okafor do it seamlessly. The men just have to change period (!), but this too is well handled by Luke Norris as Thomas, Mark Arends as Nathan and Zephryn Taitte as Daniel. Clothes, chairs and doorways are the only signposts of a change in period in Tom Piper’s pleasing impressionistic design, with Lee Curran’s lighting and Michael John McCarthy’s soundscape adding much atmosphere. Elizabeth Freestone’s staging makes the complex structure perfectly lucid.

I admired it for it’s cleverness and skilled execution and felt it was true to the spirit of Ibsen’s original. I’ll be fascinated to see whether others will be with me or my companion!

Read Full Post »

French Playwright Florian Zeller’s work has become a staple of London’s theatre in the last five years. Six of his play’s have had productions here in that period, all translated by Christopher Hampton. This seventh is the third in his family trilogy, following The Mother & The Father which, both first seen in this theatre, we saw the other way round to the order in which they were written. Though I liked the other three, those two stood out for me, and this is a very welcome companion piece.

The son, Nicolas, a teenager, seems badly affected by his parents separation. His dad Pierre has a new wife and baby son and he asks to live with them after his mother Anne struggles to cope when she discovers he hasn’t been going to school. If anything, it’s even more of a challenge at his father’s and he spirals into depression and despair. What at first seems unhappiness at the split proves to be severe depression.

It’s hard to say more without spoiling it, but it is a harrowing journey that shows the damage that can be done at a vulnerable point in a young person’s life, and the agony of the parents who have to deal with it. It doesn’t take sides, and Zeller doesn’t mess with your head as much as he did in The Father, about dementia, and The Mother, who struggles with empty nesting, but he does have a trick or two up his sleeve.

Michael Longhurst’s sensitive production features a career defining performance by John Light, at first unsympathetic, but whose pain you come to feel intensely as he lets go, and a stunning performance that oozes authenticity by Laurie Kynaston as Nicolas. Though the male leads carry the emotional weight of the play, there are excellent contributions too from Amanda Abbington as Nicolas’ mum Anne, who struggles to cope with it all, and Amaka Okafor as Pierre’s new partner Sofia, torn between supporting her man in his support of his son and focusing on their new life and new child.

It’s not an easy watch, but it’s an insightful piece which rewards you with a sense of understanding and appreciation of mental health, as the other two plays had done, and the impact marital separation can have on children.

Read Full Post »